Crazy-Facts

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The Yazidi  are a Kurdish- and Arabic-speaking ethno-religious community who practice an ancient syncretic religion linked to Zoroastrianism and early Mesopotamian religions.They live primarily in the Nineveh Province of northern Iraq, a region once part of ancient Assyria. Additional communities in Armenia, Georgia and Syria have been in decline since the 1990s, their members having migrated to Europe, especially to Germany.

The Yazidi believe in God as creator of the world, which he has placed under the care of seven “holy beings” or angels, the “chief” (archangel) of whom is Melek Taus, the “Peacock Angel.” In Zoroastrian-like tradition, the Peacock Angel embodied humanity’s potential for both good (light) and bad (dark) acts, and due to pride temporarily fell from God’s favor, before his remorseful tears extinguished the fires of his hellish prison and he reconciled with God.

Some followers of other monotheistic religion jokingly or mistakenly re-cast the Peacock Angel as the unredeemed evil deity Satan, which has incited centuries of persecution of the Yazidi as “devil worshippers” by some followers of these religions.Persecution of Yazidis has continued in their home communities within the borders of modern Iraq, under both Saddam Hussein and fundamentalist Sunni Muslim revolutionaries.

The Deaflympics are an International Olympic Committee (IOC)-sanctioned event at which deaf athletes compete at an elite level. However, unlike the athletes in other IOC-sanctioned events (i.e., the Olympics, the Paralympics, and the Special Olympics), the Deaflympians cannot be guided by sounds like the starter’s guns, bullhorn commands or referee whistles.
The Deaflympics are held every 4 years, and are the longest running multi-sport event excluding the Olympics themselves.The first games, held in Paris in 1924, were also the first ever international sporting event for athletes with a disability.The event has been held every four years since then.
Officially, the games were originally called the “International Games for the Deaf” from 1924 to 1965, but were sometimes referred to as the “International Silent Games”. From 1966 to 1999 they were called the “World Games for the Deaf”, and occasionally referred to as the “World Silent Games”. From 2001, the games have been known by their current name “Deaflympics”.

The Deaflympics are an International Olympic Committee (IOC)-sanctioned event at which deaf athletes compete at an elite level. However, unlike the athletes in other IOC-sanctioned events (i.e., the Olympics, the Paralympics, and the Special Olympics), the Deaflympians cannot be guided by sounds like the starter’s guns, bullhorn commands or referee whistles.

The Deaflympics are held every 4 years, and are the longest running multi-sport event excluding the Olympics themselves.The first games, held in Paris in 1924, were also the first ever international sporting event for athletes with a disability.The event has been held every four years since then.

Officially, the games were originally called the “International Games for the Deaf” from 1924 to 1965, but were sometimes referred to as the “International Silent Games”. From 1966 to 1999 they were called the “World Games for the Deaf”, and occasionally referred to as the “World Silent Games”. From 2001, the games have been known by their current name “Deaflympics”.

The United Nations Partition Plan for Palestine was a proposal developed by the United Nations, which recommended a partition with Economic Union of Mandatory Palestine to follow the termination of the British Mandate. On 29 November 1947, the U.N. General Assembly adopted a resolution recommending the adoption and implementation of the Plan as Resolution 181(II).

The resolution recommended the creation of independent Arab and Jewish States and the Special International Regime for the City of Jerusalem. The Partition Plan, a four-part document attached to the resolution, provided for the termination of the Mandate, the progressive withdrawal of British armed forces and the delineation of boundaries between the two States and Jerusalem. Part I of the Plan stipulated that the Mandate would be terminated as soon as possible and the United Kingdom would withdraw no later than 1 August 1948. The new states would come into existence two months after the withdrawal, but no later than 1 October 1948. The Plan sought to address the conflicting objectives and claims of two competing movements: Arab nationalism in Palestine and Jewish nationalism, known as Zionism.The Plan also called for Economic Union between the proposed states, and for the protection of religious and minority rights.

The Plan was accepted by the Jewish public, except for its fringes, and by the Jewish Agency despite its perceived limitations.With a few exceptions, the Arab leaders and governments rejected the plan of partition in the resolution and indicated an unwillingness to accept any form of territorial division. Immediately after adoption of the Resolution by the General Assembly, the civil war broke out.The partition plan was not implemented.

Terrance Stanley “Terry” Fox was a Canadian athlete, humanitarian, and cancer research activist. In 1980, with one leg having been amputated, he embarked on a cross-Canada run to raise money and awareness for cancer research. Although the spread of his cancer eventually forced him to end his quest after 143 days and 5,373 kilometres, and ultimately cost him his life, his efforts resulted in a lasting, worldwide legacy. 

In 1980, he began the Marathon of Hope, a cross-country run to raise money for cancer research. He hoped to raise one dollar for each of Canada’s 24 million people. He began with little fanfare from St. John’s, Newfoundland in April and ran the equivalent of a full marathon every day.He was forced to end his run outside of Thunder Bay when the cancer spread to his lungs. His hopes of overcoming the disease and completing his marathon ended when he died nine months later.

He was the youngest person ever named a Companion of the Order of Canada. He won the 1980 Lou Marsh Award as the nation’s top sportsman and was named Canada’s Newsmaker of the Year in both 1980 and 1981. Considered a national hero, he has had many buildings, roads and parks named in his honour across the country.

The annual Terry Fox Run, first held in 1981, has grown to involve millions of participants in over 60 countries and is now the world’s largest one-day fundraiser for cancer research; over C$600 million has been raised in his name.

Wadi Al-Salaam (Valley of Peace) is an Islamic cemetery, located in Shia holy city of Najaf, Iraq. It is the largest cemetery in the world.It is estimated that before the war about 200 to 250 corpses were buried a day, but in 2010 this number had gone down to under a hundred.

The cemetery covers 1,485.5 acres and contains some 5 million bodies. Daily burials have been on going for over 1,400 years, the site is on the Tentative List of UNESCO’s World Heritage sites.

The cemetery holds the graves of many Muslims, and is located near the shrine of Imam Ali ibn Abi Talib, the first Shia Imam and fourth Caliph. Thus, nearly all Shi’as in Iraq request that they be buried in this cemetery.

Dobri Dimitrov Dobrev better known as Grandpa Dobri or Elder Dobri  is a 99 years old Bulgarian ascetic who walks several kilometers each day to sit or stand in front of the Cathedral of Alexander Nevsky in Sofia to collect money for charitable causes.

The Saint of Bailovo donates all the money he collects to charities, orphanages, churches and monasteries. He is respected world-wide for his humble and selfless deeds. In 2009 he donated  20 000 Euro to the Cathedral of Alexander Nevsky, the largest donation to the Cathedral made by an individual until then.

The Sword of Osman was an important sword of state used during the coronation ceremony of the sultans of the Ottoman Empire.The sword was named after Osman I, founder of the Ottoman Dynasty. The practice started when Osman I was girt with the sword of Islam by his mentor and father-in-law Sheik Edebali.The girding of the sword of Osman was a vital ceremony which took place within two weeks of a sultan’s accession to the throne. It was held at the tomb complex at Eyüp, on the Golden Horn waterway in the capital Constantinople.

Until the late 19th century, non-Muslims were banned from entering the Eyüp Mosque and witnessing the girding ceremony. The first to depart from this tradition was Mehmed V, whose girding ceremony was open to people of different faiths.

Mehmed V’s brother and successor, Mehmed VI, went even further by allowing his girding ceremony to be filmed. Since he was the last reigning Ottoman sultan, this is the only such ceremony that was ever put on film.

National Doughnut Day is on the first Friday of June each year, succeeding the Doughnut Day event created by The Salvation Army in 1938 to honor the men and women who served doughnuts to soldiers during World War I.Many American doughnut stores offer free doughnuts on National Doughnut Day.

National Doughnut Day started on June 7, 1938 when a young military doctor by the name of Morgan Pett was sent to a military base. On his way there he stopped at a bakery and picked up 8 dozen doughnuts. When he arrived at the base he started helping many wounded soldiers, and would give them a free doughnut. One man he helped was a Lieutenant General by the name of Samuel Geary. Samuel Geary greatly appreciated the help on his leg, and the doughnut so he decided to make a fund raiser with Morgan Pett to give every wounded soldier, and the needy a doughnut. This fund raiser was later joined with the Salvation Army.

Andy Warhol was an American artist who was a leading figure in the visual art movement known as pop art. His works explore the relationship between artistic expression, celebrity culture and advertisement that flourished by the 1960s.

His studio, The Factory, was a famous gathering place that brought together distinguished intellectuals, drag queens, playwrights, Bohemian street people, Hollywood celebrities, and wealthy patrons.

Warhol’s art encompassed many forms of media, including hand drawing, painting, printmaking, photography, silk screening, sculpture, film, and music. He was also a pioneer in computer-generated art using Amiga computers that were introduced in 1984, two years before his death.Many of his creations are very collectible and highly valuable. The highest price ever paid for a Warhol painting is US$105 million for a 1963 canvas titled “Silver Car Crash (Double Disaster)”

The Andy Warhol Museum in his native city, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, holds an extensive permanent collection of art and archives. It is the largest museum in the United States dedicated to a single artist.

Hans Georg Henke was a sixteen-year old German antiaircrafter of the Hitler Youth.He was a member of the Luftwaffe anti-air squad who burst into tears as his world crumbled around him. His father died 1938 and his mother in 1944. He joined the Luftwaffe to support himself.

The photo was taken by American Photo Journalist John Florea 1945 in Hessen, in the village of Hüttenberg-Rechtenbach, which is just north of Frankfurt am Main. Young Henke was captured by the Americans and sent back home to Finsterwald. 

Later Hans-Georg Henke joined the East German Communist Party. Luckily, he and his 2 brothers all survived the war. He went on to live a full life and died in 1997.